Tall Buildings

[ Page 1 of 7 ]  Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 next page
Architectural Record
By Katharine Logan, Suzanne Stephens, Joann Gonchar, John Knuteson, Russell Fortmeyer

Learning Objectives:

  1. Outline different strategies for resisting wind and seismic loads in tall buildings.
  2. Describe ways tall buildings can make use of challenging sites, including those near elevated roadways and over train tracks, and discuss the urbanistic and structural ramifications.
  3. Explain how nonstandard geometries can be used to control heat gain while maximizing views and daylighting in tall buildings.
  4. Describe a novel time-saving method for constructing a tall building’s structural core.

Credits:

HSW
1 AIA LU/HSW
IACET
0.1 IACET CEU*
AIBD
1 AIBD P-CE
AAA
AAA 1 Structured Learning Hour
AANB
AANB 1 Hour of Core Learning
AAPEI
AAPEI 1 Structured Learning Hour
MAA
MAA 1 Structured Learning Hour
NLAA
NLAA 1 Hour of Core Learning
NSAA
NSAA 1 Hour of Core Learning
NWTAA
NWTAA 1 Structured Learning Hour
OAA
OAA 1 Learning Hour
SAA
SAA 1 Hour of Core Learning
 
This course can be self-reported to the AIBC, as per their CE Guidelines.
This course is approved as a Structured Course
Approved for structured learning
Approved for Core Learning
This course is approved as a Core Course
Course may qualify for Learning Hours with NWTAA
Course eligible for OAA Learning Hours
This course is approved as a core course
This course can be self-reported for Learning Units to the Architectural Institute of British Columbia

View course on architecturalrecord.com »

Believe it or not, there is no universally accepted definition of a tall building. The experts don’t agree on a minimum height to qualify. On the following pages, record has embraced this ambiguity with projects that include a 36-story residential building in St. Louis with a fan-like facade as well as a 1,148-foot-tall office tower in Shenzhen, China, and its muscular bracing system. But, despite the range, all the buildings share an interest in inventive form, ingenuity in structure, and engagement of context. Reading about them and taking the online quiz earns one hour of continuing-education credit.

PHOTOGRAPHY: © Ema Peter

Vancouver House, British Columbia Bjarke Ingels Group

 

[ Page 1 of 7 ]  Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 next page
Originally published in Architectural Record
Originally published in May 2021

Notice

Academies