Eight Fundamental Performance Characteristics of Healthcare Flooring Specification

How evidence-based design (EBD) supports clinical and operational efficiencies
[ Page 5 of 5 ]       
Sponsored by Interface
By Sandra Soraci, EDAC, LEED AP, NCIDQ

CONCLUSION

An EBD process helps align capital dollars with ROI, patient, and caregiver outcomes. There needs to be a balance of initial construction costs with long-term cost savings that result from the performance characteristics the flooring provides. Those of improved patient safety, clinical efficiency, and operational budget constraints are supported inherently with the appropriate specification of flooring. Given that reimbursement drivers are focused on outcomes, human-centered design’s ability to improve patient experience is a foundational design driver. The best flooring for a healthcare setting contributes to patient healing and satisfaction as well as caregiver health and wellness.

Sandra Soraci is the marketing leader for health care solutions at Interface. As a healthcare designer and thought leader for more than 20 years, she collaborates with and supports the sales team on the challenges that face Interface’s healthcare partners.

END NOTES

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Interface Interface is a world-leading modular flooring company with a fully integrated collection of carpet tiles and resilient flooring. Our modular system helps customers create interior spaces while positively impacting the people who use them and our planet. nora is Interface’s commercial rubber flooring systems and solutions brand. Produced in Germany for more than 65 years, nora premium rubber works to improve operations, efficiencies, health, safety, and wellness with sustainable flooring that eases maintenance, absorbs noise, and provides added comfort underfoot.

 

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Originally published in Architectural Record


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